Clarity – Marketing advice for mission-driven companies and causes

Marketing insights to help you achieve greater impact by aligning profit and purpose, for changemakers from conscious companies and meaningful causes. Empower your team and supporters to influence, inspire, and engage the communities you serve through branding, design, and marketing in our digital and social world.

Do you ever wonder why people think of your business as a “best-kept secret?” Are you frustrated because you can’t seem to connect with new customers?

After reading the protest and praise for the new Gillette ad that calls men to “be the best that you can be,” are you going to boycott Gillette?

If you’re a consumer, you’re a brand owner. Don’t let brand marketers define who you are or what to believe.

It sounds like the setup from a late-night comedy show: “Two brand consultants walked into a podcast booth...” This time, there's no joke, no punchlines... just brand truths you need to know.

If you haven't picked up on this by now or aren't aware of this truth, brand perception belongs to consumers, not brand owners. Do you measure brand sentiment or brand affinity? Typically, you’ll want to measure two dimensions: Brand characteristics and brand behavior.

The world’s most innovative nonprofits are constantly getting feedback from their constituents (donors, partners and the people they are serving). They deliberately operate with donor-centric thinking driving all initiatives and activities.

Of all the qualities that create a culture of clarity, the call to be courageous is the foundation for all the principles that guide purpose-driven leaders and organizations.

What values guide your organization to inspire, empower, and motivate people?  Does your organization’s brand personality reflect its values and its unique voice and expression?

We see it time and time again. Sales are slowing, recruiting is down, donations are low.

Then comes the call, email, or conversation: “We need a new (website, logo, marketing campaign, brand identity etc).  We patiently listen until we can explain what the problem really is.

Leaders often operate inside a bubble of their own making, forgetting that communication is the language of leadership. The quality of their communication amplifies the conviction of their leadership.

When people ask you to describe the organization for which you work, what words do you use to describe it? I’m not referring to your position statement or pitch (a brief statement that declares why your organization is the only one that serves people for a specific purpose and outcome).

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