Clarity – Marketing advice for mission-driven companies and causes

Marketing insights to help you achieve greater impact by aligning profit and purpose, for changemakers from conscious companies and meaningful causes. Empower your team and supporters to influence, inspire, and engage the communities you serve through branding, design, and marketing in our digital and social world.

Recently, we’ve had some unique opportunities to hear from visitors who frequent philanthropic, nonprofit, and community college websites. The visitors are frustrated.

In our work with mission-driven organizations, we encounter far too many JPEG and GIF format logos and not enough of what makes design and visual branding simple: vector .EPS logo formats.

As you continue to explore the significance of branding, at some point an executive director or executive will need to explain branding to the board of directors. Ideally, the board will recognize that they need to move beyond branding, to brand alignment.

Achieving brand alignment is the goal of all of the strategic planning, branding and communications of any organization (nonprofit or for profit).  In order to achieve this type of brand clarity, there are two challenges each organization must rise to.

When designing a Bible typeface, what considerations come to mind? Legibility, character count, beauty? What's most important?

A conversation with a colleague brought up the General Theory of Design, as we discussed the numbers of options that must be presented at in order to receive approval for a design project.

Three companies recently caught my attention with their direct mail, email newsletters and a blog. It's clear they are trying to be something that they're not.

My story begins with the purchase of a fountain pen, and ends with a lesson in how a brand (especially a luxury brand) achieves brand alignment.

With all the feverish activity that communications and development professionals label as branding and marketing, it’s important to remember that they are not two separate activities, but part of a continuum of communications.

Typography may seem like a small element of your branding, and easy to overlook, but it's not difficult to find many examples of weak and poorly-executed typography gracing strong or new logos (and the supporting brand identity standards).

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