Communications insights and best practices for mission-driven organizations, B corporations, nonprofits, for purpose organizations, foundations, philanthropy, and the social sector.

If you want the people your organization cares most about to connect with its mission and impact, you need to be clear about why, how, and what you do in a manner meaningful to your audience.

Every ambassador needs to speak with one voice when they represent the cause, and everyone has the potential to be an ambassador.

Startup nonprofits are like a startup business. The founder thinks they want to start a nonprofit, but it's really a business, with a nonprofit mission.

Nonprofit annual reports are an opportunity to reassure stakeholders, share a year's worth of success, and look to the future. But have you considered the greater purpose behind the stories – something more aspirational – that becomes the narrative thread, weaving the stories together into one worth telling?

How do you create a mission-driven culture of open communication for your company or cause? The Cause Manifesto is a framework of 12 ways to transform your design thinking and communication initiatives.

In almost every conversation we have with nonprofit executives and leaders, the statement is made: “the marketing committee recently met and decided to…” Yet it’s the CFO, marketing director, engagement coordinator, or executive director sitting across the table. Where are the board members in this conversation?

Achieving brand alignment is the goal of all of the strategic planning, branding and communications of any organization (nonprofit or for profit).  In order to achieve this type of brand clarity, there are two challenges each organization must rise to.

A conversation with a colleague brought up the General Theory of Design, as we discussed the numbers of options that must be presented at in order to receive approval for a design project.

With all the feverish activity that communications and development professionals label as branding and marketing, it’s important to remember that they are not two separate activities, but part of a continuum of communications.

Page 2 of 2